Federal Courts

Can Judges Help Ease Mass Incarceration?

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Vol. 107 No. 3 (2024) | Justitia

A scholar considers how judges have contributed to historically high incarceration rates — and how they can help reverse the trend. While the American criminal justice system was once known […]

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Justice O’Connor Named 2024 Bolch Prize Recipient

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Vol. 107 No. 3 (2024) | Justitia

PICTURED ABOVE: Justice O’Connor speaking to law students at the University of Texas in 1985. (© Bob Daemmrich/Alamy.com) The late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor has been named the […]

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“Our Response Must Be Faster and Louder”

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Vol. 107 No. 2 (2023) | Generative AI in the Courts

Those who become judges don the robe expecting to work hard. They accept that the job comes with heavy caseloads, endless filings to read, and difficult decisions that must be made […]

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The First Fifteen

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Vol. 107 No. 1 (2023) | Toward Fairer, Quicker, Cheaper Litigation

This is a book written with generosity and bravery. It is generous in the sense that 15 Asian American women have decided to share their stories about how they became […]

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Justice Breyer Retires From the Court

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Vol. 106 No. 3 (2023) | Forging New Trails

Justice Stephen Breyer’s retirement from the Supreme Court closes the book on a nearly 30-year term filled with erudite opinions. But it also marks the end of a unique presence in oral arguments. […]

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Visiting Judges: Riding Circuit and Beyond

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Vol. 106 No. 3 (2023) | Forging New Trails

The curious phenomenon of visiting judges and its serious benefits to the federal courts There is a curious phenomenon in the federal courts. An attorney recently arguing before the First Circuit […]

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Shortlisted

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Vol. 106 No. 3 (2023) | Forging New Trails

When Kentanji Brown Jackson was confirmed to the United States Supreme Court, she became the sixth woman to take the bench on the nation’s highest court. Her addition also put […]

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‘The People’ Have Decided

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Vol. 106 No. 2 (2022) | Losing faith?

There are many great judges. Only some have a major impact on our law — or even more rarely on our larger culture and society — and most of those […]

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Third Circuit Clarifies Ascertainability Standard for Class Actions

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Vol. 99 No. 2 (2015) | The Mass-Tort MDL Vortex

Third Circuit Clarifies Ascertainability Standard for Class Actions In Byrd v. Aaron’s, Inc. (Byrd v. Aaron’s Inc., 784 F.3d 154 (3d Cir. 2015)), the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third […]

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Bureaucratizing the Courts? Finding MDL’s Place in the Traditional Legal Culture

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Vol. 99 No. 2 (2015) | The Mass-Tort MDL Vortex

Over the past three decades three forces gained prominence in the narrative of the 1938 rules: the decline of trials with a companion embrace by bench and bar of arbitration and […]

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