International

An Uphill Battle: How China’s obsession with social stability is blocking judicial reform

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Autumn 2016 | Volume 100 Number 3

During the past three years, China has proclaimed a judicial reform campaign that aims to follow the “rule by law” (yifa zhiguo) in civil dispute resolutions. In delivering the 2014 […]

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China’s E-Justice Revolution

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Spring 2021 | Volume 105 Number 1

(Pictured Above: View of an online hearing at the Hangzhou Internet Court, in Hangzhou City, the first court in the world designed to hear cases nearly exclusively online. Disputes focus […]

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Stylized image of Lady Justice

Criticism of the Judiciary: The Virtue of Moderation

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Summer 2017 | Volume 101 Number 2

Former Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi once described the judiciary as the “cancer of democracy.”1 This presumably had much to do with his personal situation of being accused several times […]

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Building Administrative Scaffolding in Small Courts: Experiences in the U.S. and Abroad

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Fall/Winter 2020–21 | Volume 104 Number 3

In 2014, two years after graduating law school, I was appointed to serve as a municipal court judge in Guadalupe, Ariz.1 The town had the highest unemployment rate in Maricopa […]

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The Innovation and Limitations of Arbitral Courts

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Fall/Winter 2020–21 | Volume 104 Number 3

In recent years, governments from the state of Delaware to the Emirate of Dubai have created institutions specially designed to adjudicate transnational commercial disputes. These institutions are hybrids between courts […]

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The Collapse of Judicial Independence in Poland: A Cautionary Tale

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Fall/Winter 2020–21 | Volume 104 Number 3

In late 2019, the Polish Sejm approved yet another law aimed at cabining the structure and function of the judiciary. The new law, popularly referred to as a “muzzle” law, empowers a disciplinary chamber to bring proceedings against judges for questioning the ruling party’s platform. The law allows the Polish government to fire judges, or cut their salaries, for speaking out against legislation aimed at the judiciary, or for questioning the legitimacy of new judicial appointees.

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My Own Liberator: A Conversation with Dikgang Moseneke

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Summer 2020 | Volume 104 Number 2

During a lunch-hour event with students at Duke Law School in February, David F. Levi, director of the Bolch Judicial Institute, interviewed former Deputy Chief Justice Dikgang Moseneke of the […]

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A Remarkable Journey to the ‘Centre Chair’

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Summer 2020, Storied Third Branch | Archive

Above: Beverley McLachlin, 17th Chief Justice of Canada (Photo by Roy Grogran, courtesy of the Supreme Court of Canada) Beverley McLachlin, widely regarded as one of the best legal minds […]

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