International

Lady Justice and Barbed Wire

Judicial Independence: Threats Foreign and Domestic

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Vol. 105 No. 2 | Judicial Independence

Judicial Independence has so long been a pillar of American government that perhaps it was at one time taken for granted. The idea that politicians would intimidate judges, that judges […]

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A Report from the 2015 United States–United Kingdom Legal Exchange

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Vol. 100 No. 2 | A Judge in Public Life

INTRODUCTION1 This paper was originally presented at the United Kingdom-United States Legal Exchange in London, England, in September 2015. The Exchange, sponsored by the American College of Trial Lawyers, originated […]

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An Uphill Battle: How China’s obsession with social stability is blocking judicial reform

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Vol. 100 No. 3 | Who appointed me god?

During the past three years, China has proclaimed a judicial reform campaign that aims to follow the “rule by law” (yifa zhiguo) in civil dispute resolutions. In delivering the 2014 […]

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Algorithms, Artificial Intelligence, and the Law

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Vol. 105 No. 1 | The Courts Held

Much attention is paid to our brave new world wrought by algorithms and artificial technology, one in which many societal functions are accelerated and made more efficient — and more […]

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China’s E-Justice Revolution

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Vol. 105 No. 1 | The Courts Held

(Pictured Above: View of an online hearing at the Hangzhou Internet Court, in Hangzhou City, the first court in the world designed to hear cases nearly exclusively online. Disputes focus […]

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Image of EU flag blowing in the wind

From the Editor: A European Perspective

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Vol. 101 No. 2 | Can science save justice?

The President of the United States referred to a judge who ruled against the executive as a “so-called” judge. Both his most recent French colleagues called the judiciary “flavorless green […]

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Copyright Symbol surrounded by stars with Britain depicted as a shooting star going away from the circle

IP Law Post-Brexit

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Vol. 101 No. 2 | Can science save justice?

FOUR EUROPEAN IP EXPERTS ASSESS THE LIKELY IMPACT of BREXIT on INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS in the UK AND EU — AND WHAT IT ALL MEANS for the UNITED STATES On […]

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Stylized image of Lady Justice

Criticism of the Judiciary: The Virtue of Moderation

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Vol. 101 No. 2 | Can science save justice?

Former Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi once described the judiciary as the “cancer of democracy.”1 This presumably had much to do with his personal situation of being accused several times […]

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Building Administrative Scaffolding in Small Courts: Experiences in the U.S. and Abroad

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Vol. 104 No. 3 | Judges on the March

In 2014, two years after graduating law school, I was appointed to serve as a municipal court judge in Guadalupe, Ariz.1 The town had the highest unemployment rate in Maricopa […]

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The Innovation and Limitations of Arbitral Courts

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Vol. 104 No. 3 | Judges on the March

In recent years, governments from the state of Delaware to the Emirate of Dubai have created institutions specially designed to adjudicate transnational commercial disputes. These institutions are hybrids between courts […]

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