Rule of Law

Kiribati flag printed on canvas

A Personal Journey Through the Rule of Law in the South Pacific

by

Judicature International | An online-only publication

Conceptually, the idea that the rule of law is maintained by an independent and impartial judiciary is not difficult to understand. In fact, we really only hear about “the rule […]

Read More »

Honoring the 2020 & 2021 Recipients of the Bolch Prize

by , and

Vol. 105 No. 2 | Judicial Independence

The Bolch Judicial Institute at Duke Law School honored the 2020 and 2021 recipients of the Bolch Prize for the Rule of Law during a virtual program hosted by PBS […]

Read More »

Lady Justice and Barbed Wire

Judicial Independence: Threats Foreign and Domestic

by , , , and

Vol. 105 No. 2 | Judicial Independence

Judicial Independence has so long been a pillar of American government that perhaps it was at one time taken for granted. The idea that politicians would intimidate judges, that judges […]

Read More »

Table of Contents

by

Vol. 100 No. 4 | Steady As She Goes

— Features — REVISED GUIDELINES & PRACTICES FOR IMPLEMENTING THE 2015 DISCOVERY AMENDMENTS TO ACHIEVE PROPORTIONALITY Duke Law Center for Judicial Studies HOW TWO NEW RULES FOR SELF-AUTHENTICATION WILL SAVE […]

Read More »

Table of Contents

by

Vol. 105 No. 1 | The Courts Held

— Features — 2020 ELECTION LITIGATION: THE COURTS HELD David F. Levi, Amelia Ashton Thorn & John Macy THE FUTURE OF THE U.S. PRESIDENCY David Kennedy, Daphna Renan, Terry Moe, […]

Read More »

,

Retired Mass. Chief Justice Margaret H. Marshall to Receive 2021 Bolch Prize for the Rule of Law

by

Vol. 105 No. 1 | The Courts Held

Margaret H. Marshall — former chief justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court and a lifelong advocate for a more transparent, efficient, and accountable judiciary — will receive the 2021 […]

Read More »

2020 Election Litigation: The Courts Held

by , and

Vol. 105 No. 1 | The Courts Held

We had an extraordinary election in November 2020. More Americans voted than in any other election, even though an infectious virus still stalked the nation. Immediately following election day, we […]

Read More »

The Future of the U.S. Presidency

by , , , and

Vol. 105 No. 1 | The Courts Held

What will be the legacy of the Trump presidency? Was this administration uniquely tumultuous because of Donald Trump’s personality and beliefs? Or are there other external forces or circumstances at […]

Read More »

Foundations of U.S. Federalism

by and

Vol. 101 No. 1 | Citizen-centered Courts

What precisely is American federalism? In their seminal work on federal jurisdiction, Felix Frankfurter and Wilber Katz allude to a “dynamic struggle” between federal and state power, the ebb and […]

Read More »

The Collapse of Judicial Independence in Poland: A Cautionary Tale

by and

Vol. 104 No. 3 | Judges on the March

In late 2019, the Polish Sejm approved yet another law aimed at cabining the structure and function of the judiciary. The new law, popularly referred to as a “muzzle” law, empowers a disciplinary chamber to bring proceedings against judges for questioning the ruling party’s platform. The law allows the Polish government to fire judges, or cut their salaries, for speaking out against legislation aimed at the judiciary, or for questioning the legitimacy of new judicial appointees.

Read More »