Law & Culture

Justice for All: Artwork by Natasha Ramras (PDF)

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Vol. 106 No. 3 (2023) | Forging New Trails

Natasha Ramras is an Oregon/Washington painter who uses acrylic and oil to capture the beauty of the Pacific Northwest in her landscapes and the salient issues of the day in her contemporary works. […]

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Person marking paper with red pen

The Case for Contractions (PDF)

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Vol. 106 No. 3 (2023) | Forging New Trails

In a very short browse on Westlaw, I found some sentences that, in my view, would be improved by contractions: […]

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What Do Judges Need to Know About Generation Z?

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Vol. 106 No. 3 (2023) | Forging New Trails

The most diverse, tech-savvy, anxious, and socially conscious generation to date is entering the legal profession. Members of Generation Z, also called “Gen Z” or “Zoomers,” will soon fill the […]

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Trailblazing Chief Justices in the American States

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Vol. 106 No. 3 (2023) | Forging New Trails

The diversity of the American bench is frequently scrutinized by politicians, journalists, academics, and jurists themselves. This has been particularly true in recent years as the U.S. Supreme Court has […]

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New Ideas About How Judges Think

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Vol. 106 No. 3 (2023) | Forging New Trails

Political scientists and legal scholars don’t necessarily have the same perspectives when it comes to the study of how judges make decisions. Legal scholars tend to take a more internal […]

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Visiting Judges: Riding Circuit and Beyond

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Vol. 106 No. 3 (2023) | Forging New Trails

The curious phenomenon of visiting judges and its serious benefits to the federal courts There is a curious phenomenon in the federal courts. An attorney recently arguing before the First Circuit […]

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Case Processing Time Standards Take Hold in State Courts

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Vol. 106 No. 3 (2023) | Forging New Trails

For centuries, courts have grappled with the question of speedy and timely justice. Until the 20th century, this was almost exclusively viewed as a legal question: At what point does […]

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Illustration of person behind bars with "innocence" written in multiple langauges.

Toward Recognizing an International Human Right to Claim Innocence

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Judicature International (2021-22) | An online-only publication

In the last decade, nations have begun to formally recognize an individual’s right — at any time — to raise post-conviction claims of factual innocence. Despite the recognition at the state level, no international human rights instrument fully recognizes the right to assert one’s claim of innocence.

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A Global Judicial News Report: October 2022

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Judicature International (2021-22) | An online-only publication

Find a summary of news and headlines related to courts, judiciaries, and the rule of law from around the world in October 2022.

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Legal Tradition — Or Symbol of Subjugation?

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Vol. 106 No. 2 (2022) | Losing faith?

Recently a huge controversy erupted in Zimbabwe over the alleged purchase of British horsehair wigs for Zimbabwean judges. Given the financial challenges ordinary Zimbabweans face, it was not surprising that […]

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