Law & Culture

Illustration of person behind bars with "innocence" written in multiple langauges.

Toward Recognizing an International Human Right to Claim Innocence

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Judicature International | An online-only publication

In the last decade, nations have begun to formally recognize an individual’s right — at any time — to raise post-conviction claims of factual innocence. Despite the recognition at the state level, no international human rights instrument fully recognizes the right to assert one’s claim of innocence.

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A Global Judicial News Report: October 2022

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Judicature International | An online-only publication

Find a summary of news and headlines related to courts, judiciaries, and the rule of law from around the world in October 2022.

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Legal Tradition — Or Symbol of Subjugation?

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Vol. 106 No. 2 | Losing faith?

Recently a huge controversy erupted in Zimbabwe over the alleged purchase of British horsehair wigs for Zimbabwean judges. Given the financial challenges ordinary Zimbabweans face, it was not surprising that […]

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Artificial Justice: The Quandary of AI in the Courtroom

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Judicature International | An online-only publication

Artificial intelligence is here, and it’s everywhere. The technology is so pervasive, in fact, that it now hides in plain sight — in our cars and on our coffee tables. […]

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Person marking paper with red pen

Taking aim (again) at multiword prepositions (PDF)

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Vol. 106 No. 2 | Losing faith?

Since I didn’t wipe them out the first time (Summer 2018), I am reloading. Multiword prepositions—also called compound or complex or phrasal prepositions—are among the most noxious and pervasive small-scale faults in legal writing. […]

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‘The People’ Have Decided

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Vol. 106 No. 2 | Losing faith?

There are many great judges. Only some have a major impact on our law — or even more rarely on our larger culture and society — and most of those […]

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Image of supreme court being reflected in a pool of wahter

Losing Faith: Why Public Trust in the Judiciary Matters

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Vol. 106 No. 2 | Losing faith?

What can judges do about America’s declining trust in public institutions?

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Legal Information vs. Legal Advice: A 25 Year Retrospective

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Vol. 106 No. 2 | Losing faith?

In modern times, a key question in access to justice has been: To what extent can court personnel assist unrepresented litigants in filing and managing their claims? The answer to […]

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Trauma-Informed Judicial Practice from the Judges’ Perspective

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Vol. 106 No. 2 | Losing faith?

Research sends a clear message: The effects of trauma cannot be ignored within our court system. Up to 90 percent of adolescents and 75 percent of adults involved in the […]

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Bolch Prize 2022: A Shining Example

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Vol. 106 No. 2 | Losing faith?

Through more than 50 years of service on the federal bench, Judge J. Clifford Wallace, chief judge emeritus of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, has led […]

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