Technology

AI in the Courts: How Worried Should We Be?

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Vol. 107 No. 3 (2024) | Justitia

Scholars and technologists see both benefits and dangers for AI in the courts. One thing they agree on: AI is here to stay. As we enter 2024, it’s tough not […]

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The Battle for Your Brain: A Legal Scholar’s Argument for Protecting Brain Data and Cognitive Liberty

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Vol. 107 No. 3 (2024) | Justitia

Mindreading may sound like the stuff of science fiction, but these days, as they say, truth is stranger than fiction. Employers track employee attention and even moods. Technology users can […]

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Is Disclosure and Certification of the Use of Generative AI Really Necessary?

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Vol. 107 No. 2 (2023) | Generative AI in the Courts

The news abounds with articles on the promises — and perils — of generative AI (GenAI) […]

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Judging Firearms Evidence and the Rule 702 Amendments

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Vol. 107 No. 2 (2023) | Generative AI in the Courts

Forensic firearms identification involves linking evidence collected from crime scenes — namely, fired cartridge casings and bullets — to a particular firearm. Two assumptions underlie this identification process: First, firearms […]

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Virtual Voir Dire Works — for Courts and Jurors

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Vol. 107 No. 1 (2023) | Toward Fairer, Quicker, Cheaper Litigation

As the COVID-19 pandemic began rolling through the United States, medical staffs were as busy as they had ever been. News reports showed doctors and nurses grabbing quick naps between […]

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Is ‘Forensic Science’ A Misnomer?

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Vol. 106 No. 3 (2023) | Forging New Trails

With the exception of DNA analysis, a great deal of so-called “forensic science” — that is, the analysis of tool marks, bite marks, hair comparisons, fingerprints, blood spatters, arson patterns, and […]

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You Are Being Scanned

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Vol. 106 No. 3 (2023) | Forging New Trails

It’s 1890. Responding in part to the invention of “instantaneous” photography, Samuel Warren and Louis Brandeis write The Right to Privacy, urging legal recognition of “the right to be let alone,” which […]

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Best Practices for Trauma-Informed Virtual Hearings

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Vol. 106 No. 2 (2022) | Losing faith?

When physical distancing measures required courts to quickly adapt operations, the National Center for State Courts (NCSC) saw an opportunity to examine the experience of families and child welfare court […]

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Artificial Justice: The Quandary of AI in the Courtroom

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Judicature International (2021-22) | An online-only publication

Artificial intelligence is here, and it’s everywhere. The technology is so pervasive, in fact, that it now hides in plain sight — in our cars and on our coffee tables. […]

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10 Things Judges Should Know About Cryptocurrency

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Vol. 106 No. 2 (2022) | Losing faith?

By now, you have probably heard of cryptocurrency and blockchain technology. Perhaps, however, you have found the topics impenetrable or doubted their relevance to the courtroom. But cryptocurrency is a […]

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