Feature

A bridge too far

A bridge too far? An expert panel examines the promise and peril of third-party litigation financing

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Fall 2019 | Volume 103 Number 3

Third-party litigation finance has captured the attention of litigants, the courts, and the academy across the globe. It has the potential to substantially impact civil litigation as we know it […]

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Boxed In: Does the Prospect of Re-Selection Influence Judicial Decision Making?

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Fall 2019 | Volume 103 Number 3

When Justice Ann A. Scott Timmer was given the opportunity to write on a topic of her choosing as part of Duke Law’s Master of Judicial Studies program, she gravitated […]

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Emails to a Federal Judge

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Fall 2019 | Volume 103 Number 3

Recently an esteemed member of the bar died. In closing out the lawyer’s laptop, a legal assistant discovered a trove of emails the lawyer had composed and addressed to a […]

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The Twilight Zone

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Fall 2019 | Volume 103 Number 3

The television drama The Twilight Zone portrayed characters in disturbing situations set in the murky area between reality and the dark unknown. Most episodes had a moral. Here’s my thought for […]

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Lawyers, the Legal Profession & Access to Justice in the United States: A Brief History

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Fall 2019 | Volume 103 Number 3

In no profession is the gulf greater between ideals and practices than it is for lawyers. Ideally, justice is a universal good: the law protects equally the rights of the […]

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Stevens, J., Dissenting: The Legacy of Heller

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Fall 2019 | Volume 103 Number 3

Second Amendment scholars discuss the late Justice John Paul Stevens’s contributions to one of the nation’s thorniest debates During his 34 years on the Supreme Court, Justice John Paul Stevens […]

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Access to Affordable Justice: A Challenge to the Bench, Bar, and Academy

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Autumn 2016 | Volume 100 Number 3

Most everyone agrees that in the American civil justice system many important legal rights go unvindicated, serious losses remain uncompensated, and those called on to defend their conduct are often […]

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Reentry philosophies, approaches, and challenges

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Summer 2018 | Volume 102 Number 2

Competing notions of crime and punishment have shaped the administration of criminal justice in the United States ever since the Quakers established the Walnut Street Prison in 1773 in Philadelphia, […]

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A Matter of Style: Perceptions of Chief Justice Leadership on State Supreme Courts With an Eye Toward Gendered Differences

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Summer 2018 | Volume 102 Number 2

Although most research on court leadership still focuses on the Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court, researchers are increasingly interested in state supreme courts, and with good reason. […]

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10 Things Judges Should Know About AI

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Spring 2019 | Volume 103 Number 1

With recent and dramatic advances in the capacities of machine learning, we are now beginning to see artificial intelligence (AI) tools come into their own. This matters for our judiciary, not […]

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