Court Administration

Portrait of three women judges sitting at the bench

Shattering Glass Ceilings from the Bench

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Fall 2019 | Volume 103 Number 3

Federal Judge Sylvia Rambo first thought of a legal career in the 1940s when her school bus drove by a local law school in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. “It was like a […]

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The Twilight Zone

The Twilight Zone

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Fall 2019 | Volume 103 Number 3

The television drama The Twilight Zone portrayed characters in disturbing situations set in the murky area between reality and the dark unknown. Most episodes had a moral. Here’s my thought for […]

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Lawyers, the Legal Profession & Access to Justice in the United States: A Brief History

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Fall 2019 | Volume 103 Number 3

In no profession is the gulf greater between ideals and practices than it is for lawyers. Ideally, justice is a universal good: the law protects equally the rights of the […]

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Reclaiming the Role of Lawyers as Community Connectors

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Fall 2019 | Volume 103 Number 3

For many years, there has been a serious debate about the legal profession’s exclusive role in the market for legal representation. The debate has focused on how that role factors […]

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The Process Due: The American Academy of Arts and Sciences offers a multidisciplinary examination of the devastating and persistent crisis in legal services

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Fall 2019 | Volume 103 Number 3

Earlier this year, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences dedicated an issue of Dædelus, its quarterly scholarly journal, entirely to the topic of “Access to Justice.” Fittingly, it was […]

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Cover Art Fall 2019 Judicature

Fixing Fees, Fines & Bail: Toward a Fairer System of Justice

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Fall 2019 | Volume 103 Number 3

State Chief Justices and Court Administrators Discuss What’s Working — And What’s Not — As Courts Strive to Reform Fees, Fines, and Bail Practices Long ignored and highly localized, abusive […]

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meyer levenson summer 2018

Reflections on a Reentry Court

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Summer 2018 | Volume 102 Number 2

Kevin hesitates in the doorway before entering Courtroom 3. When Kevin was 26, he was tried and sentenced in this courtroom. The judge who presided over his trial and sentencing […]

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Cartoon image of a judge

The Disappearing Probate Court

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Summer 2019 | Volume 103 Number 2

In 1967, Maine voters amended the state constitution to authorize the elimination of the state’s county-controlled, county-operated, county-funded Probate Courts.[1] In 2019, the Maine legislature debated a “concept draft” enabling […]

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Hornby Spring 2019

Can Federal Sentencing Remain Transparent?

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Spring 2019 | Volume 103 Number 1

Criminal trials have virtually disappeared in many federal courtrooms.[1] According to a recent U.S. Sentencing Commission report, “[i]n recent years, 97 percent of federal defendants convicted of a felony or […]

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Graphic of defendant looking in mirror while being sentenced

Conversations of a Lifetime: The Power of the Sentencing Colloquy and How to Make It Matter

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Summer 2019 | Volume 103 Number 2

In recent years, there has been increased attention on sentencing, and particularly sentencing disparities. The thrust and focus of this attention have been on the statistics of sentencing and reforms, […]

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